April 12, 2006

Stroller Locks: This Is How We Roll In Brooklyn

curbed_strollerA reader at curbed.com snapped this photo of a fine-looking Maclaren Quest chained to the planter yesterday in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn.

What looks at first like street smarts--as any furniture-starved New Yorker can tell you, that's the "I'm throwing this out, but you can have it if you can haul it away" side of the sidewalk--turns out to involve all sorts of baby-hatin' intrigue and real estate envy. [And this is different from daily life in Brooklyn how, exactly?]

See, according the comments the Atlantic Avenue YMCA where the stroller was chained was recently the scene of some conflicts over the Y's new, draconian "Don't park that stroller in here!" regulations. And anyway, that Y is not even IN Cobble Hill, thank you very much. More like "Boerum Hill" or "Downtown Brooklyn" [where, I take it, strollerjacking is an everyday occurrence.]

Glad to see people have moved beyond the whole gender-coded hat spat and have gotten back to what's really important.

The Mean Streets of Cobble Hill
[curbed.com]
Previously: Stroller Lock?

1 Comment

I clicked on that link. I read. I marveled.

Not knowing the mating and migratory patterns of the gentry of New York, I'm going to guess that this is an urban (is there another kind in NYC) neighborhood that has a lot rich folk in it.

This then begs the question: how is it that these people have so much time on their hands that they can worry/argue about idiocy like this?

Further, once everyone complies with the "no kids in strollers" rule (which, at it's root this is) will there be a "no kids running around the lobby" rule?

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