February 21, 2010

Giacometti-esque: Bumming Man


5 table, originally uploaded by MrsBadger.

How's that for proof of concept?

DT regular Becster sent the kids to grandma's and whipped up a Giacommeti-style doll out of aluminum foil. And then she spent a few minutes posing him in the dollhouse in existentially distraught scenes.

I think we're ready to progress to some mold-ready wire&Sculpey models.

Giacometti Doll House (Set) [flickr]

4 Comments

There's this stuff called precious metal clay that a lot of Etsy sellers are using these days (I haven't really seen it anywhere else but I looked it up after seeing some earrings or something made out of it).

I think it would work really well for this project.

There's also this stuff you can get called Rub N Buff (sp?) that will give regular polymer clay an awesome patina. It could be very authentic looking.

thanks, that looks perfect. I think we may end up making a few figures with it. To make them posable, though we'll probably have to then cast them in something.

Or maybe it's amigurumi over florist's wire, like this crocheted scuba diver. Those legs look promising, and the idea of a kawaii crocheted Giacometti doll is already cracking me up.

Greg,
if you're already using a non-sulfurous clay, you could expand your world and move into resin casting.

In terms of initial buy-in, you're better off getting your product in bulk from a distributor and avoiding the hobby or art store mark up. Starter kits are extremely expensive per-ounce.

It makes a bit mess, but in terms of material, resin is tintable, dyeable, or paintable.

If you wanted the dolls to be truly pose-able, you could make the master, cut it apart and add ball and sockets to the major joints, then sprue them and cast them. After the castings have hardened, you could drill them out and string them with elastic or rubber.

Comic-con here I come!

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