October 25, 2005

Stroller Smackdown: Daddy Typed For Slate

My years of fawning over Ann Hulbert's writing has finally paid off. Slate has published the first chapter of my dissertation on stroller-buying. It's about 10,000 words, and--I hope you're sitting down for this--less than half of them are "Bugaboo." Surprised?

He's Having A Baby [slate]

ps and yes, if you're wondering, that's the kid in background of the Phil & Ted's picture. She's looking at her National Zoo friends, the OCD emu and the arthritic kangaroo.

UPDATE: As Matt Haughey, a satisfied Phil & Ted's owner, points out, there is a car seat attachment available for the e3. Here's his picture of it on flickr.

8 Comments

One small comment: there's a car seat attachment for the Phil and Ted's. It's about $30 for a bar that can accept an infant carseat. Here it is on our stroller: http://flickr.com/photos/mathowie/12980618/

Congrats on getting published..too bad the article was two years too late for us! We ended up with the Zooper Buddy, which is no longer made. In your analogies, I would call it a Subaru - none of the status of the fancier strollers, but most of the benefits at a lower price.

bravo, greg! terrific piece.

tho as another satisfied yet apparently oddly defensive phil & ted owner, i'd say that the thing folds really easily. i am neither physically strong nor possessed of an engineering degree; the thing just doesn't fold like any other stroller i've seen. as you no doubt figured out, you have to kinda pull out a pin near the front wheel, as if detonating a grenade, and then the whole thing jackknifes inward very satisfyingly. much easier than folding any other double.

a fellow phil & ted owner in downtown manhattan reports being stopped recently by a good-looking fellow in a baseball cap who asked a lot of questions about the phil & ted and told my friend he was expecting his second kid and the phil & ted looked really cool. that man, sir, was jon stewart.

really enjoyed the slate piece.

[Like I said, inexplicable. That "wha wha wha?" befuddlement obviously disappears as soon as you use a stroller for any amount of time. Meanwhile, you're obviously too polite to point out you scooped me with the Phil & Ted's rave on Salon.com. But then you are also kind to provide the Jon Stewart scoop, which now gets bumped up to its own post. Thanks! -ed.]

Well done, Greg. We've always been a MacLaren family (currently pushing a Volo), but remain curious about the others, especially the Phil & Ted. I was also hoping to see the Stokke, but I guess there was only room for one in the top price range.

And to think we knew you when......

You even used the word "panoply"! I guess you need an upscale vocabulary to talk about them 800$ strollers!

[slate pays by the syllable, not the word. -ed.]

Awesome job! We've given the article some BB love.

Great article and nice work testing out all those new rides. If you see Hitchens at the Slate holiday party, tell him I said hi.

Great article. I was wondering why the Peg Perego line of strollers is (almost) never mentionned in here? I like my Pliko a lot, it is light (15 pounds I think) while having big, sturdy (plastic) wheels and fine design and fabric colours. I can also attach the newborn car seat on it very easily. Any special reason? Just not a trendy stroller?

[Mostly because we don't have one and we never looked at getting one. If Peg ever made any moves or had any products that seemed particularly dad-aware, I'd probably perk my ears up, but the last thing I heard about was the stroller with an electric motor, which seems like the diametric opposite. Unless it's for parents with Epstein-Barr or something, in which case, I'm sure I'd fully support it. -ed.]

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