July 10, 2005

Sure, But Does Hooters Like Babies? The Kid-Free Dining Concept

While discussing the kid-nonfriendliness of Las Vegas casinos [which sounds pretty obvious as I type it now], DT reader/Canadian [or at least Canada restaurant expert] Kirk writes: "There are restaurants in Canada that are also going this way. They do not ban children (because that's illegal to do), but they advertise that they do NOT provide high chairs, children's menus, crayons, etc."

Interest piqued and stereotypes at the ready, I Googled "Hooters 'high chairs'," and found a 2003 Orlando Sentinel article about a new restaurant concept from the company behind who such concepts as Red Lobster ["shrimp: it's practically lobster!"] and The Olive Garden ["carbs and cream sauce by the minivanful"]. It's called Seasons 52, as in "what's fresh this week."

Frankly, to me, its no-high chairs, no-children's menu, no-crayons approach doesn't mean no-kids, it just means no-playing-while-eating, no-running-around, and no-I-only-want-chicken-tenders. It's not "No Families," it's just "No Family Circus." And anyway, if you've got a Stokke Xplory, you can just wheel that bad boy right up to the table.

See the Sentinel reader's heated reactions to the concept here, a 2005 review of the Seasons 52 concept here, which will apparently be coming soon to a promenade-like entertainment/retail concept near you.

Oh, and Hooters? They have a whole selection of baby stuff, including t-shirts, bibs, and rompers. And really, if you think about it, what more baby-friendly dining concept could there be?

1 Comment

All I saw was "hooters" ... this isn't the breastfeeding discussion again, is it?

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