August 9, 2009

Yes We Cane! Rattan Kids Furniture By Kay Bojesen [?!]

bojesen_cane_pram_swimsuit.JPG

Is there anything that Kay Bojesen didn't make? In 1949, he created an export collection of rattan [spanskrør] kids and doll furniture for R. Wengler, basketmakers to HKH Frederic IX, King of Denmark.

And the awesome pram above--sorry, doll-size only--from the Japanese design blog Swimsuit Department, is just the beginning. SD has a vintage Wengler photo of Bojesen's pram, the matching bassinet, and a kid-size stool, three pieces mentioned on the produktionsliste on the exhaustive Kay Bojesen samling.

wengler_bojesen_swimsuit.JPG

But there's also a vintage showroom shot of a veritable rattanapalooza of kid-sized product. Did Bojesen design that double pushchair? Or the rocking sled? How about that tiki-style toy boat up top? I would have to guess yes.

bojesensamler_kayak.jpg

Because somehow the idea that Bojesen would only design a doll pram and cradle--and a freakin' kid-sized, ride-on, rattan kayak--makes no sense.

That kayak, by the way, is in Gustav's incredible Bojesen collection, one of the largest in Denmark, which is on exhibit at the Rudersdal Museer, just north of Copenhagen. The exhibition was scheduled to close today, but it has been extended until Sept 13. Hop to, and you can see another Bojesen pram in person.

more images and documentation: Baby Carriage [swimsuit department via reference library]
Installation photos of the Kay Bojesen Samler exhibition at the Rudersdal Museer [kaybojesensamler.dk]
Rudersdal Museer | Kay Bojesen - Det legende Menneske [sollerod.dk, google translate]

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